A Sense of Adventure

August 29, 2014 Andrew Bushnell - Blog PostPhoto Andrew

Most of us will never be a Merriwether Lewis or a William Clark. We will never have the chance to forge a path through unexplored territories (unexplored by the white man), to make contact with unknown cultures, and to describe new species. The Corps of Expedition and the men that lead that group are the classic explorers, and have the classic adventure story. After reading Undaunted Courage, the story of Lewis and Clark, I found myself to be slightly depressed by my own experiences and adventures. Things that I had considered adventuresome like hiking and camping now seemed like a walk in the park compared to the trials and tribulations of Lewis and Clark. Just to keep their energy levels up they ate 9 pounds of meat a day. How can I compete with that? For weeks I thought about how its unfair that every place we venture to has pretty much been seen, been documented, been explored. Spending days in the Frank Church Wilderness, I found signs of humanity in the rusty cans, fire rings, and ropes you inevitably find in some camp. To me, these things were just another sign that I was not on the level of these old time adventurers. My adventure was not as new, not as groundbreaking. Everything that I was seeing had already been seen. People had been in these places, and I thought this made my modern day adventures less meaningful. One night though, as I lay in my tent, a wolf howled. For forty-five minutes, I listened to its somber chorus. Across the riffles of Indian creek, just 100 yards from where I slept, it moved up the ridge until it faded off and sounds of the creek were again the only noise in the night. Lying there, I came to a realization. I can never be a Lewis or Clark. I can’t paddle across the continent on undammed rivers, and I certainty cant hunt grizzly bears that roam the plains. Those adventures are past. Being in the Frank Church Wilderness all summer taught me a new kind of exploring. The exploring that comes from seeing a new place for the first time. Yes, someone else has probably been there and seen it before you, but no one has seen it from your eyes. No one before me has heard that same wolf howl in that same spot in that same instant. No one has seen that riffle in that sharp evening light the way you see it. No one has seen that meadow after the storm that just rumbled through. And no one can see and experience the things you encounter the same way you have. This in its self is like discovering places for the first time. Exploration is not dead. Adventures are still to be had. Just not in the flagpole planting kind of sense. We can’t be Lewis and Clark, and that’s ok. A summer in the Frank taught me this. In these wild places, the exploration and adventure is in the uniqueness of our encounters with the landscape. Each time we go out, we see something different and experience the land in a way that no one has before. The age of adventure and exploration lives. Its out there. Its in the ever changing landscape and features of the wilderness, and its in the way we see these places. Each time new, because each time experienced through new eyes.